The Skinny on Losing Weight While Fattening Your Wallet by Angela Brandt

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While the thought of squeezing into a bikini or taking your shirt off at the pool might be enough to prompt some review of the extra pounds you’re carrying around, the impact that being overweight has on your pocketbook is an even better reason.

Obese and overweight people have higher living expenses. To compound the problem, heavier women tend to earn less than slimmer counterparts. Also, being overweight can contribute to higher health care and insurance costs.

Losing pounds could easily save you hundreds — even thousands – of dollars. That should halt any rationalizing that you’re too broke to get fit.

Most of us know what it takes to lose weight: Train, say your prayers, take your vitamins — wait, those are Hulk Hogan’s words. Exercise and proper nutrition are a good start, though.

I’m not fat – I’m big-boned
Odds are you’re overweight. That’s not an insult – just a fact. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say 69 percent of Americans are overweight or obese.

Even more startling: If the current trajectory continues, 50 percent of us will be obese by 2030.

If there’s any question if you’re normal, overweight or obese, enter your weight and height here.

Underweight — BMI is less than 18.5.
Normal weight — BMI is 18.5 to 24.9.
Overweight — BMI is 25 to 29.9.
Obese — BMI is 30 or more.

Now that you have your body mass index number, let’s do a little math regarding tonight’s dinner.

I can’t afford to eat healthy

Read more at http://www.moneytalksnews.com/2013/07/23/the-skinny-on-losing-weight-while-fattening-your-wallet/#7vbgMDZWvXzxb5v3.99

9 Sneaky Ways to Eat Less

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by Chris Garcia

Eating too fast is making your waistline expand, suggest two new studies presented at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society.

Men who consider themselves fast eaters have significantly higher body mass indexes (BMIs) than slower eaters, one study found. Men also eat faster than women, downing 80 calories a minute compared to just 52 for the fairer sex.

Researchers also found a connection between periods of emotional turmoil and faster eating, says University of Rhode Island professor Kathleen Melanson, Ph.D. When you are emotional, you pay less attention to what you are eating than you would normally. You desire the satisfaction of tasting food, which may drive you to eat fast, Melanson explains.

Eating fast doesn’t allow the nerve endings in your stomach—called stretch receptors—time to recognize when the stomach is full. You then overeat, leading to weight gain, researchers say.

So what can you do to keep yourself from shoveling down food?

Relax before you eat. Being stressed will make you feel like you need to eat quicker, said Melanson. One solution: Remember a vacation or time when you felt particularly relaxed. This tricks your mind into remembering the sounds, tastes, and feelings of being de-stressed.

Use smaller utensils, especially smaller spoons or chopsticks. Those who do consume 70 less calories per meal, according to a University of Rhode Island at Kingston study.

Savor the first three bites. When you pay attention and analyze the texture and the taste of food, you trick your mind into believing your stomach is fuller, says Jeffrey Greeson, Ph.D., a health psychologist at Duke Integrative Medicine.

Place your utensil in your non-dominant hand (if you are right-handed put it in your left, and vice versa). You will be more deliberate with each bite, making it easier to enjoy your food.

Sip water between bites. You will stay hydrated, keeping you from confusing dehydration with hunger and slowing the bites you take.

Talk to others at the dinner table. By expanding the conversation, you take longer between bites. Researchers at Flinders University found stimulating your mind keeps you from overindulging.

Add spice or hot sauce. Spice signals receptors in the brain and wakes it up to the fact that you are eating, said Greeson. It will also make you pay attention to flavor and drink more water.

Avoid soda and other sweet drinks made with high-fructose corn syrup. A University of California at San Francisco study found that the corn syrup blocks a key hormone that tells us when we are full.

Try black tea. A study in the Journal of American College of Nutrition found that black tea decreases blood sugar levels by 10 percent for 2 1/2 hours so you’ll feel fuller faster and avoid hunger later on.

http://news.menshealth.com/9-ways-to-eat-slower/2011/11/15/

Why is Healthy Weight Important?

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Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight is important for overall health and can help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. If you are overweight or obese, you are at higher risk of developing serious health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, gallstones, breathing problems, and certain cancers. That is why maintaining a healthy weight is so important: It helps you lower your risk for developing these problems, helps you feel good about yourself, and gives you more energy to enjoy life.

What Is Overweight and Obesity?

Overweight is having extra body weight from muscle, bone, fat, and/or water. Obesity is having a high amount of extra body fat. Body mass index (BMI) is a useful measure of overweight and obesity. The information on this Web site will provide you with information about BMI (including limitations of this measure) and how to reach and stay at a healthy weight. Talk to your health care provider if you are concerned about your BMI.
What Factors Contribute To a Healthy Weight?

Many factors can contribute to a person’s weight. These factors include environment, family history and genetics, metabolism (the way your body changes food and oxygen into energy), and behavior or habits.

Energy Balance

Energy balance is important for maintaining a healthy weight. The amount of energy or calories you get from food and drinks (energy IN) is balanced with the energy your body uses for things like breathing, digesting, and being physically active (energy OUT):

The same amount of energy IN and energy OUT over time = weight stays the same (energy balance)
More energy IN than OUT over time = weight gain
More energy OUT than IN over time = weight loss
To maintain a healthy weight, your energy IN and OUT don’t have to balance exactly every day. It’s the balance over time that helps you maintain a healthy weight.

You can reach and maintain a healthy weight if you:
* Follow a healthy diet, and if you are overweight or obese, reduce your daily intake by 500 calories for weight loss
* Are physically active
* Limit the time you spend being physically inactive

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/index.htm

Defining Overweight and Obesity

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Overweight and obesity are both labels for ranges of weight that are greater than what is generally considered healthy for a given height. The terms also identify ranges of weight that have been shown to increase the likelihood of certain diseases and other health problems.

Definitions for Adults

For adults, overweight and obesity ranges are determined by using weight and height to calculate a number called the “body mass index” (BMI). BMI is used because, for most people, it correlates with their amount of body fat.

An adult who has a BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight.
An adult who has a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

See the following table for an example:

Height Weight Range BMI Considered
5′ 9″ 124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
125 lbs to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Healthy weight
169 lbs to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

It is important to remember that although BMI correlates with the amount of body fat, BMI does not directly measure body fat. As a result, some people, such as athletes, may have a BMI that identifies them as overweight even though they do not have excess body fat. For more information about BMI, visit Body Mass Index.

Other methods of estimating body fat and body fat distribution include measurements of skinfold thickness and waist circumference, calculation of waist-to-hip circumference ratios, and techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Read more here: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/adult/defining.html