Is Fasting One Day a Week Good for Your Health? by Dr. Ben Kim

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Is fasting one day a week good for your health? To answer this question, let’s take a look at what happens in your body when you begin to eat and drink nothing but water.

After your cells use up the sugar that is in your bloodstream from your last meal or beverage, your body has to find another source of energy for your cells. And the first places that it turns to are your liver and your muscles. Both your liver and your muscles store sugar in the form of glycogen, and when needed, glycogen can be broken down to glucose, which all of your cells can use to produce energy for their ongoing activities.

During a water-only fast, your glycogen stores are depleted within about 24 hours, give or take a few hours. After your glycogen stores are used up, most of your cells begin burning fatty acids for energy – these fatty acids come from your fat reserves, including fatty tissue that surrounds your organs.

Two groups of cells – your red blood cells and your brain cells – cannot use fatty acids to fuel their energy needs. Your red blood cells and brain require glucose, and once glycogen/glucose from your muscles and liver are used up, your brain and your red blood cells get their glucose from two sources:

From glycerol, which is a component of your fat tissues.

From your muscles – some of your muscle tissues get broken down, and the amino acids from your muscle tissues are used to produce glucose for your brain and red blood cells.

Clearly, it’s not in your best interest to rapidly eat up your muscles to meet the energy requirements of your brain and red blood cells during a water-only fast. Your body knows this, and somewhere between the 2nd and 3rd day of water-only fasting, your liver begins churning out ketones, which during a water-only fast, come primarily from the breakdown of fatty acids from your fat reserves.

Read the rest here: http://drbenkim.com/fasting-fast-one-day-week.htm