Is Your House Making You Fat?

If you keep choosing cheese curls over biceps curls, your home could have a lot to do with it.

“Your habits are more tied to your environment than you know,” psychologist Jeremy Dean, the author of “Making Habits, Breaking Habits,” said.

Eat enough chips on the couch, for instance, and you’ll automatically associate couch time with chip time. Our routines are so influenced by environmental cues that research shows it’s easier to change our habits in a novel setting.

“We see major shifts in behavior when people move to a new house,” Dean said. But you don’t have to relocate to start anew; you just need to become aware of the subtle cues that say “cake!” and replace them with healthy alternatives.

“The typical person makes about 200 food-related decisions a day, but she believes she makes 25 to 30. And it’s those 175 that you’re not aware of that can push you to eat more,” Brian Wansink, the director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab and the author of the upcoming book “Slim by Design,” said. 

Here’s how to help your home help you get (or stay) slender.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/18/is-your-home-obesogenic/?intcmp=features#ixzz2fGVMGy69

Kathie Lapcevic lost 108 Pounds – “I Still Can’t Believe That’s ME in the Mirror” from Diets in Review

20130810-205017.jpg

Kathie Lapcevic looks in the mirror and still has trouble believing that the person looking back at her, is half her previous size. In 18 months, Kathie has shed 108 pounds and she’s currently no more than a side salad and a jog around the block from her goal weight. As a writer and teacher with a passion for gardening, canning and other do-it-yourself endeavours, Kathie was not a stranger to discipline or hard work, except when it came to her own health. “I was overweight my entire life,” she said. “The girl who got made fun of, the girl who always wanted to figure out a better way but didn’t know how to begin.”

Recently Kathie spoke to us about her weight loss journey, future goals and where she finally got the determination to lose the weight.

Read more at http://www.dietsinreview.com/diet_column/08/kathie-lapcevic-lost-108-pounds-i-still-cant-believe-thats-me-in-the-mirror/#qme7De7QkXrb0Ljf.99

The Skinny on Losing Weight While Fattening Your Wallet by Angela Brandt

20130723-204517.jpg

While the thought of squeezing into a bikini or taking your shirt off at the pool might be enough to prompt some review of the extra pounds you’re carrying around, the impact that being overweight has on your pocketbook is an even better reason.

Obese and overweight people have higher living expenses. To compound the problem, heavier women tend to earn less than slimmer counterparts. Also, being overweight can contribute to higher health care and insurance costs.

Losing pounds could easily save you hundreds — even thousands – of dollars. That should halt any rationalizing that you’re too broke to get fit.

Most of us know what it takes to lose weight: Train, say your prayers, take your vitamins — wait, those are Hulk Hogan’s words. Exercise and proper nutrition are a good start, though.

I’m not fat – I’m big-boned
Odds are you’re overweight. That’s not an insult – just a fact. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say 69 percent of Americans are overweight or obese.

Even more startling: If the current trajectory continues, 50 percent of us will be obese by 2030.

If there’s any question if you’re normal, overweight or obese, enter your weight and height here.

Underweight — BMI is less than 18.5.
Normal weight — BMI is 18.5 to 24.9.
Overweight — BMI is 25 to 29.9.
Obese — BMI is 30 or more.

Now that you have your body mass index number, let’s do a little math regarding tonight’s dinner.

I can’t afford to eat healthy

Read more at http://www.moneytalksnews.com/2013/07/23/the-skinny-on-losing-weight-while-fattening-your-wallet/#7vbgMDZWvXzxb5v3.99